Category Archives: Nut Free

Thick, creamy rice milk

I have stumbled across a way to make my DIY rice milk quite thick and creamy… completely by fluke.

Now this may bring up nightmares from some peoples’ childhoods, but, its really not that scary…

Chokos. Yep. Those strange green vegetables (that double as a fruit?)…

Choko

Click on the picture to go to original source & find out more on chokos

How? What the?

OK so I used my Thermomix to chop up some swede and choko to add to a lamb mince bolognese the other day… and then gave it a quick rinse but used it immediately to make our standard rice milk recipe – which is a variation of Quirky Jo’s Rice and Almond milk – here.

So normally when I do Jo’s recipe, I make a double batch (I use a lot of this milk!) and instead of using cashews, I do about 2 x 90g (ie 180g total) of rice turned into flour as per instructions … as littlest miss cannot have nuts at present. For a long time I just did the suggested amount of rice plus a little, but I was finding it too runny. I also always cook it with 1L of water and then add an extra 1L as per Jo’s doubling suggestions.

Instead of being cooked for 6 minutes, I’ve been starting to do it for 7, to again just help it thicken/cream up.

The other day I made it, promptly forgot about it and was engrossed in one discussion or another online, came back to it some time later, and it was SO thick and creamy, I couldn’t believe it! It hadn’t settled out into gluggy rice flour at the bottom and watery rice milk at the top. It was thick the whole way through.

I *think* that it is because of the saponins in the choko. Anyone who has peeled a choko knows it makes your hands feel a bit funny as you peel it. It can make them actually quite dry/strangely tight skin, to the extent that hubby and I wear a glove when we are doing any more than one at a time to avoid the sap.

Today I experimented and found that the following combo worked a treat, and its now in my fridge, thick and mixed, and tastes great.

This is to make 2L:

  • 120-130gg rice turned into flour (I use a 50/50 mix of medium and long grain white rice)
  • ~60-80g rice malt syrup
  • piece of a choko (literally can be a 2-3cm piece only – use the rest in a cake, stew or casserole. It is a good source of vitamin c and takes on the flavour of whatever you cook it with! I often use about half a choko just because its some more nutrients in there…)
  • Pinch of your preferred salt
  • 1L + 1L of water
  • 2T coconut (approx 40g…. or whatever failsafe/other oil you can use – canola and rice bran oil work fine)

Method:

  1. Grind rice flour ~1.5 mins sp 9 and set aside. [I have a tub of pre-milled rice flour ready to go for all my recipes]
  2. Chop choko about Speed 6 for 2-3 seconds or until its fully chopped and on the sides of the Thermie bowl
  3. Add rice flour, salt, 1L of water, rice malt syrup and oil.
  4. Cook 70 degrees C, 7 minutes, speed 4 and then I blend for about 1 minute gradually stepping up to speed 9 (like the method used for soups/veggie stock etc).***
  5. Strain via nut bag or cheese cloth/muslin etc. If desired.
  6. Add extra 1L of water to strained mixture and refrigerate.

I have previously used a nut bag to strain the remaining rice flour off, but to be honest, there’s very little left now so I think its probably just as easy to put in a jug and store! There may be a little sediment at the end, but its so thick now its a pain to use the nutbag.

My 'take' on Quirky Jo's Rice MIlk

My ‘take’ on Quirky Jo’s Rice MIlk

 *** I have been finding in cold weather it is taking longer and sometimes even a hotter temp (80C) to get it thickening. The individual choko used can impact on it too, so I think how fresh they are may impact on it, but I don’t have any on my vine at the moment so I have no way to judge it!***

Filed under Dairy Free, Egg Free, Failsafe, Gluten Free, Nut Free, Soy Free, Using the Thermomix

Happy New Year!

Best wishes from Kristan and family - here's to an awesome 2014 for all! :-)

Best wishes from Kristan and family – here’s to an awesome 2014 for all! 🙂

The Newsletter

I’m getting in early this month so I can wish everyone a Happy New Year, but also give you as much time as possible to consider Interest Free purchase options, as well as getting in quickly to book into a Demonstration if you have been thinking about it during January.

You can read the newsletter via PDF from……….. HERE

(I will edit in the details for January promotions to this area once available)

Some thoughts on food, Thermomix’s and having survived my first food-intolerance-filled Christmas…

I can’t tell you how relieved I am to have had my Thermomix this Christmas. It has meant I could do easy meals, quickly and under pressure with hungry kids on those busy days in the lead-up to Christmas… not to mention allowing me to travel with our highly food-intolerant toddler without much of a food-fallout either.

The easy clean-up even in someone else’s kitchen was fantastic, as was the ability to make batches of goodies in advance when my older children needed food so they could stay with their grandparents for a few days between Christmas and New Year.

Gluten, dairy, soy, egg and corn free bread rolls

Gluten, dairy, soy, egg and corn free bread rolls

These bread rolls are one food I prepared for my family around Christmas – nice easy snack and gets them away from thinking of gluten filled bread!

It’s been my current project to get them more ‘normal’ … I’ve managed to get them to a fairly stable point now – they come out consistently fluffy and similar to ‘normal’ bread rolls. Big catch with them seems to be the oven temperature that you cook them at. I pre-heat the oven to 200C and generally cook there or a bit cooler, for around 15-20 minutes. If you are finding that your bread/rolls aren’t cooking through, maybe try having the oven hotter in the pre-heating stage at least. It will probably come down to experimentation with how your oven best functions.

I will update the recipe (here) with some more pictures and clarifying what I do in the coming weeks.

Enough from me for now! Best wishes for 2014, and I hope that it is everything you had hoped for, and not too many of those nasty unexpected things pop in!

Please take care in the remainder of this festive season.

– Kristan

Filed under Corn Free, Dairy Free, Egg Free, Failsafe, Gluten Free, Health and Wellbeing, Ingredient Specific Restrictions, Nut Free, Soy Free, Using the Thermomix

Fluffy and tasty Gluten, Dairy, Egg, Corn and Soy Free Bread…

Yes, you did read fluffy bread which is gluten and so many other things free!

First of all, full credit to Trish, the lady behind ‘Failsafe Foodie’ (see original here)… she gave me some sanity back, and saved my hip-pocket from trying more breads that I just couldn’t eat anyway due to reactions to ingredients AND which is quite tasty too.

Now I have changed the recipe to be Thermomix friendly and swapping sugar for rice malt syrup since I have my Thermomix to do it now and am trying to minimise processed sugar, which is hard when you are on a heavily restricted diet.

The recipe seems to be much fluffier and more perfect than I have ever managed to achieve with a stand mixer.

DSC_9437

Mind you, its important to note, I have found rice flour type does matter with this. More about that below the recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 600g water
  • 2 tsp yeast
  • 1 tbsp rice malt syrup (or approx 20g works fine)
  • 2 tbsp psyllium husks (I’ve been adding 4 tbsp and it results in a more ‘normal’ loaf AND you can even roll them out as bread rolls)
  • 20g oil (I use rice bran or failsafe canola)
  • 100g brown rice flour*
  • 170g white rice flour *
  • 100g sorghum flour
  • 170g tapioca starch
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking powder

* –> I actually just do 270g white rice flour. Results will be best with brown and white flour; picture is from using rice flour prepared in the Thermomix from medium grain white rice.

Method

  1. Add water and rice malt syrup into Thermomix bowl. Mix at 37 degrees C for approx 2 minutes on speed 1 – until  heated and well mixd/dissolved.
  2. Add yeast, mix on speed 1 for ~30 seconds.
  3. Leave approximately 10 minutes to activate yeast – ideally while preparing dry ingredients to add later.
  4. Add psyllium husk and mix on speed 1 for 10-15 seconds until gently mixed. Ideally leave for a few minutes to ‘gel’ up. Leaving longer is worth it! Another 10+ mins is ideal.
  5. Add oil then dry ingredients.
  6. Knead mixture for 2 minutes on the interval setting.
  7. Put mixture into prepared/greased loaf tin/s**. Leave in a warm place to proof for 20-60 minutes. With this proofing time – the longer the better I have found, but it works well ok with 20 minutes on a warm day. Aim is to allow to double in volume.
  8. Bake in a pre-heated 200-220 degree C oven for about 50 minutes (will vary between ovens, mine cooks extremely quickly, so after ~40 is done).
  9. Remove from tin and cool on rack.

** –> Worth noting that when made in the Thermomix, it does get more aerated and/or rise more, so, it can be prone to overflowing in a standard loaf tin.

I’ve taken to keeping a little out in another smaller loaf tin (as pictured) that I have and doing a ‘mini’ loaf as well. I intend on tweaking the recipe soon so it will stay in one loaf tin!

So in the mean time, maybe about half-fill your loaf tin and then put the rest into silicone muffin cases or a muffin tray to make bread rolls? Only about half-fill them to allow room to rise.

Some hints:

  • If you spray your measuring spoons with a little oil before adding the rice malt syrup, it will all come out easily and avoid a sticky mess. Or just weigh it 😉
  • We use silicone baking trays and actually do some of the cooking in the microwave to speed up the process. After being allowed to proof, I cook the loaf for 7 minutes at 700w and then 15 minutes at about 200C. Our oven cooks relatively hot, so most ovens will probably need a little longer
  • For best fluffiness and texture with this recipe, use rice flour milled yourself. I use medium grain white rice and make my own rice flour with it. The imported (Asian) brand that I can get from local supermarkets is better for other baking, but will leave loaves flat and soggier.

 

Filed under Corn Free, Dairy Free, Egg Free, Failsafe, Gluten Free, Ingredient Specific Restrictions, Nut Free, Soy Free